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Agriculture

  • Emergency haying, grazing available Aug. 2

    DES MOINES —  Iowa Farm Service Agency (FSA) State Executive Director John R. Whitaker announced last week the emergency haying and grazing for all Iowa counties for certain practices enrolled in the Conservation Reserve Program (CRP), effective on Aug. 2.  

    Haying activities must be completed by Aug. 31.  All livestock and hay must be removed by Sept. 30.

  • Ask the Experts: Growing potatoes

    Iowa State University Extension and Outreach horticulturists share information about the potato (Solanum tuberosum), one of the most important vegetable crops in the world. To have additional plant and garden questions answered, contact the ISU Hortline at 515-294-3108 or hortline@iastate.edu.

    Why are my potatoes knobby?

    Fluctuations in soil moisture levels during tuber development may cause knobby potatoes. Watering on a regular basis (about once a week) during dry periods will help prevent this problem.

  • Webinar examines livestock, crop options during drought

    AMES – Iowa crop and livestock producers dealing with drought–related issues are invited to attend an Iowa State University Extension and Outreach webinar Wednesday, July 25 to learn more about options available to them.

    Several county extension offices will be hosting the 1- 3 p.m. webinar. There is no charge to attend the webinar.

    Livestock

    Livestock issues covered  will include options to help producers manage immediate needs related to stressed pastures and reduced hay supplies.

  • Yard and Garden: Cucumbers, tomatoes and raspberries

    AMES — Iowa State University Extension and Outreach horticulturists share information about bitter cucumbers, tomatoes that aren’t setting fruit and why red raspberries may be partly white. To have additional plant and garden questions answered, contact the ISU Hortline at 515-294-3108 or hortline@iastate.edu.

    Why are my cucumbers bitter?

    Hot, dry conditions are usually responsible for bitterness in cucumbers in Iowa.

  • Ask the Experts: Offering advice on keeping trees healthy

    AMES — Iowans are noticing changes in their trees this summer and asking Iowa State University Extension and Outreach horticulture specialists about symptoms that may indicate stress or decline in the health of their trees. The specialists answer several of those questions and are available to answer additional questions through the Iowa State Hortline at hortline@iastate.edu or 515-294-3108. Visit the Yard and Garden FAQs website at http://expert.hort.iastate.edu/ to find answers to tree and other yard and garden questions.

  • Tips to avoid cattle heat stress

    AMES — With continuing weather forecasts of temperatures in the mid-to-upper 90s and heat index topping 100 degrees, Iowa State University Extension and Outreach beef veterinarian Grant Dewell reminds cattle producers properly preparing for these weather conditions is vital to maintaining herd health. Five steps to avoiding heat stress in your herd:

    — Plan ahead. After cattle get hot, it’s too late to prevent problems.

  • New residue testing procedures released by food and safety

    AMES — With the announcement by the USDA’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) of new methods with increased efficiencies for testing residues in meat products, Iowa State University Extension and Outreach swine veterinarian James McKean urges pork producers to review their operational and management decisions regarding drug usage.

    "Pork has had minimal violative antimicrobial residues for many years,” McKean said.
    “Knowing about this new testing procedure and program will help producers maintain that level of results.”

  • Ask the Experts: Growing sweet corn

    AMES — Sweet corn is one of the most popular vegetables in the home garden, roadside stands and farmers' markets. This summer’s hot, dry weather has growers asking Iowa State University Extension and Outreach horticulture specialists about sweet corn. To have additional questions answered, contact the experts at hortline@iastate.edu or call 515-294-3108.

    The ears on my sweet corn are poorly filled. What are possible causes?

  • Crop, food price concerns rise with Iowa’s temperatures

    DES MOINES — While Midwest corn and soybean crops are wilting from several days of triple-digit temperatures, shoppers wonder if they’ll feel the heat of rising food prices later this year.

  • Fair Demonstration