.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Agriculture

  • Yard and Garden: Cucumbers, tomatoes and raspberries

    AMES — Iowa State University Extension and Outreach horticulturists share information about bitter cucumbers, tomatoes that aren’t setting fruit and why red raspberries may be partly white. To have additional plant and garden questions answered, contact the ISU Hortline at 515-294-3108 or hortline@iastate.edu.

    Why are my cucumbers bitter?

    Hot, dry conditions are usually responsible for bitterness in cucumbers in Iowa.

  • Ask the Experts: Offering advice on keeping trees healthy

    AMES — Iowans are noticing changes in their trees this summer and asking Iowa State University Extension and Outreach horticulture specialists about symptoms that may indicate stress or decline in the health of their trees. The specialists answer several of those questions and are available to answer additional questions through the Iowa State Hortline at hortline@iastate.edu or 515-294-3108. Visit the Yard and Garden FAQs website at http://expert.hort.iastate.edu/ to find answers to tree and other yard and garden questions.

  • Tips to avoid cattle heat stress

    AMES — With continuing weather forecasts of temperatures in the mid-to-upper 90s and heat index topping 100 degrees, Iowa State University Extension and Outreach beef veterinarian Grant Dewell reminds cattle producers properly preparing for these weather conditions is vital to maintaining herd health. Five steps to avoiding heat stress in your herd:

    — Plan ahead. After cattle get hot, it’s too late to prevent problems.

  • New residue testing procedures released by food and safety

    AMES — With the announcement by the USDA’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) of new methods with increased efficiencies for testing residues in meat products, Iowa State University Extension and Outreach swine veterinarian James McKean urges pork producers to review their operational and management decisions regarding drug usage.

    "Pork has had minimal violative antimicrobial residues for many years,” McKean said.
    “Knowing about this new testing procedure and program will help producers maintain that level of results.”

  • Ask the Experts: Growing sweet corn

    AMES — Sweet corn is one of the most popular vegetables in the home garden, roadside stands and farmers' markets. This summer’s hot, dry weather has growers asking Iowa State University Extension and Outreach horticulture specialists about sweet corn. To have additional questions answered, contact the experts at hortline@iastate.edu or call 515-294-3108.

    The ears on my sweet corn are poorly filled. What are possible causes?

  • Crop, food price concerns rise with Iowa’s temperatures

    DES MOINES — While Midwest corn and soybean crops are wilting from several days of triple-digit temperatures, shoppers wonder if they’ll feel the heat of rising food prices later this year.

  • Fair Demonstration
  • Ask the Experts: Watering outside plants

    AMES — Knowing when to water and how to water plants is one of the most important aspects of gardening and can make all the difference to the health of plants. Iowa State University Extension and Outreach specialists answer questions about watering plants in containers, gardens and lawns. To have additional questions answered, contact the experts at hortline@iastate.edu or call 515-294-3108.

    How often should I water plants in containers?

  • Publication illustrates energy used in row crop Production

    AMES – Each year, approximately three-fourths of Iowa’s farmland is planted with corn or soybeans. A new publication from Iowa State University Extension and Outreach shows the proportions of energy used to grow a typical corn or soybean crop in Iowa.

    “Energy Consumption for Row Crop Production” (PM 2089W) is available to download from the Extension Online Store, https://store.extension.iastate.edu.

  • Living mulch in corn rows discussed in webinar

    AMES — The Iowa Learning Farms’ June webinar featured Ken Moore, Iowa State University distinguished professor of agronomy.

    Moore shared the results of an ongoing Iowa State evaluation of perennial-established cover crops maintained between rows of corn. These perennial living mulches save soil moisture, slow soil erosion and sequester carbon. Preliminary results are promising. In addition to the soil benefits, higher corn grain yields are reported with the living mulch treatments.