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Government

  • FEMA makes additional assistance available to public entities and nonprofits in counties impacted by severe weather

     Gov. Kim Reynolds has received word that additional assistance is now available to public and nonprofit entities in some counties impacted by severe weather between March 12 and May 16, 2019.

     Thirteen counties have been added to a disaster declaration issued by President Trump on March 23, 2019, making them eligible to apply for the federal Public Assistance Program.

  • Water Summary Update: May the sixth wettest on record in Iowa

    Since last June, Iowa has seen its wettest 12-month stretch on record, with this May being the sixth wettest on record, according to the latest Water Summary Update.

    “Not only was precipitation in May greater than normal for Iowa, the past 12 months have been the wettest on record for Iowa and for nearly all of the surrounding states," said Tim Hall, DNR’s coordinator of hydrology resources. “River flooding continues to be of concern on both the Missouri and the Mississippi rivers.”

  • Mill County added to disaster listing for May 17 storms

    Gov. Kim Reynolds issued a disaster proclamation today for three counties in response to severe weather beginning May 17 and continuing.
     
    The governor's proclamation allows state resources to be utilized to respond to and recover from the effects of this severe weather and activates the Iowa Individual Assistance Grant Program for qualifying residents, along with the Disaster Case Management Program, for Mills, Muscatine, and Washington counties.
     

  • Iowa Weather Summary for first week of June

    IOWA PRELIMINARY WEATHER SUMMARY
    Provided by Justin Glisan, Ph.D., State Climatologist
    Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship

  • Iowa farmers finally getting dry weather

    Iowa farmers finally got the dryer weather they were looking for with 5.2 days suitable for fieldwork statewide during the week ending June 9, 2019, according to the USDA, National Agricultural Statistics Service. This is the first time this season farmers had more than 5.0 days suitable for field work. This allowed farmers to plant corn and soybeans, cut hay, and spray fields with nitrogen.

  • Iowa farmers continue to battle wet field conditions

    Iowa farmers continue to battle wet field conditions as another week of heavy rainfall limited farmers to only 1.3 days suitable for fieldwork statewide during the week ending June 2, 2019, according to the USDA, National Agricultural Statistics Service. The lower third of Iowa had 0.5 day suitable for fieldwork or less for the second week in a row.
    Topsoil moisture levels rated 0 percent very short, 0 percent short, 50 percent adequate and 50 percent surplus. Subsoil moisture levels rated 0 percent very short, 0 percent short, 49 percent adequate and 51 percent surplus.

  • Malvern to celebrate its past and present with huge city-wide bash the last weekend of June

  • I-29 closed from St. Joe to Glenwood exit

    Interstate 29 is now closed in both southwest Iowa and northwest Missouri due to flooding.

    Officials with the Missouri Department of Transportation say I-29 is now closed from north of St. Joseph to the Iowa border. The Missouri closure came just hours after officials had reopened the roadway. I-29 in Iowa is now closed from the Missouri border to the Highway 34 exit near Pacific Junction, according to the Iowa DOT.

    Additionally, the Iowa DOT has closed I-29 between Exit 61 at Crescent and the I-680 interchange south of Missouri Valley.

  • Iowa smoke free homes registry adds user-friendly features

    The Iowa Smoke Free Homes Registry now includes more features to help renters find the smoke-free property that best meets their needs. The registry’s smoke-free rental properties map now also shows transit stops, parks, grocery stores and farmers markets.

  • Fawning season is here, deer are on the move

    The calls have been coming in to field offices and conservation officers for the past few weeks and will only increase as the calendar flips to June - the peak fawning season is right around the corner.

    Callers report finding an “abandoned” fawn in an unusual place, like a flowerbed or small patch of cover. Rest assured this is normal deer behavior.