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Today's Opinions

  • Tracing the history of the aebleskiver

    With deep sadness we announce that the annual Charles Steinbrecher Memorial Ale and Cheese Tasting gala was cancelled due to a severe lack of interest. 

    This year’s offerings included a reproduction of Steinbrecher’s 1870 Red Oak Special, an IPA, a Petite Saison D’Ete, and my wife’s favorite, a multi-grain light called the Speckled Heifer.  

    The cheese selection was a choice block of aged Velveeta.  Anderson Park was to have been the site. 

  • Courage to not be comfy

    There is a link between comfort and courage.

    I know many times throughout my life I have talked with people about being able to “step out of their comfort zone” to be successful at what they want to do.

    For those who are already overwhelmingly successful and wealthy beyond their wildest dreams, you can probably stop reading this, because you have already broken the threshold I'm talking about.

  • Columnist’s knowledge of statistics questioned

    Dear Editor,
    Opinion is all well and good, but it should be informed. So I have questions for Marge Warder: Have you spent time in our public schools recently? Do you understand where the “50 percentile” goal you reference (Aug. 31) with such disdain originated?
    It’s from George W. Bush’s signature education reform No Child Left Behind. According to NCLB, a score of 40 percent or higher demonstrates proficiency.

  • November election has a little more going for it now

    So much for a quiet county election come November.
    As you may have read on the front page, we have three somewhat unexpected races at the County level, even though no one filed for the Democratic nomination in the August primary.
    Alan Kirshen, after losing to County Attorney Bruce Swanson in the primary, is back again on the Independent party ticket, while Dave McFarland and Colleen Magnuson are running for Board of Supervisors and County Recorder, respectively, as a no-party candidate.

  • Trying to figure out what is the truth

    Do you really believe that what you believe is really true?
    All of us, child through centenarian, are moving toward the end of our earthly life. Wouldn’t it be horrid to come to our last hours and discover we had bought a lie?
    It’s not an exaggeration to say we are lied to every day. Some lies we easily spot, other are subtle. Some lies are so common, they seem logical.    
    Last Sunday evening, over 50 area people from seven churches met at the Montgomery County YMCA to wrestle with the question, “What is truth?”

  • Roy answers questions, for free, but only once

    We attended KMA’s birthday party and wished them many more to come.  Standing in line in 95 degree heat for a couple of pancakes caused me to wonder if it wouldn’t have been wiser to send a card, but the event was nicely done.  
    Much ado was made about a radio station being around for 85 years.  
    This is no doubt quite a feat.  Consider, though, that when KMA was born in 1925 our Red Oak Express was old enough to join AARP, had there been an AARP.  

  • A lesson on picking a path

    I was a 5-foot-2, 140-pound, not-particularily-athletic freshman that wanted to do everything I could to play varsity for my school’s state-ranked football team.  I would do anything, including jump into the nose-guard position on the scout-team defense against an all-conference center and in front of a backfield loaded with award-winning stars.
    As the ball was snapped I charged straight ahead into the center.  He stepped hard to the right, giving me an easy pass to the left.

  • Red Oak citizens deserve to speak at Council meetings

    In anticipation of heightened interest from local residents, Red Oak’s City Council hosted two recent meetings inside the fire station’s community room.
    At both meetings, the controversial mandatory trash pick-up ordinance was discussed, and at both meetings, the room was packed.
    Another common theme from those meetings: not a single one of those interested residents were allowed to voice their opinion.